Dante's Cure, A Journey Into Madness Contact the Author
by Daniel Dorman, MD
   

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Artwork

Dr. Dorman's art
linocut of catherine
(Click to enlarge)


Catherine
1975
Daniel Dorman
Reduction Linocut
15 1/4” x 15 1/4”



Artist's Statement:
At the time I made this linocut, I had been treating Catherine for five years, and she was on her way to recovery. But her silent, tortured agony while in the the hospital haunted me. Her image had been lodged in my mind from the moment I met her. Training programs in psychiatry and psychology emphasize that the therapist should be neutral, just reflecting back his opinions, “interpretations” they are called. I am convinced that the therapist must not deny his humanity. That is part of the cure.



Catherine Penney's art

Catherine was encouraged to participate in occupational therapy while she was in treatment. She created these drawings, each addressed to Dr. Dorman.

Cathy's drawing 1
(Click to enlarge)


Where’s My Body?
1970
Catherine Penney
Drawing




Cathy's drawing 1
(Click to enlarge)


Help
1970
Catherine Penney
Drawing




Cathy's drawing 1
(Click to enlarge)


May She Rest In Peace
1971
Catherine Penney
Drawing




Artist's Statement:
The drawings represent my states of mind when I was in the depths of psychosis. The disembodied head with tears meant that: I had no sense of substance. I felt detached and separated. I was at the mercy of chaotic unstable forces and I experienced a profound sense of "not being." I was asking for help. The picture of the hand coming out of the water meant that I was drowning-dying-sinking down into the abyss, yet a small part of me still hung onto some hope. The third picture of the graveyard represented shattered hope. I had succumbed to the relentless battle of trying to outwit the voices, of trying to survive on my own terms. Not even intervention from the outside (Dr. Dorman or the hospital) could save me.